Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying happens more and more now than it ever has in the past. We caught up with Jane, aka Nurse A on Tiktok, to discuss her cyberbullying and how it affected her. 

Intro: 

You’re listening to Dumbed Down Tech, where we break down tech concepts, and we go back to the basics. 

MP: 

Today, we’re going to be talking about cyberbullying and how it affects people’s personal lives, and what we can do to prevent that. We have our guest today, a very special guest. I’ll let her introduce herself. 

NA: 

Hi. My name is Jane. Some of my followers might know me as Nurse A on Tiktok. 

MP: 

Well, welcome nurse A. I’m very glad that you decided to come on the show, because I think this is a hot topic and a lot of people don’t know what to do in these scenarios. It is helpful to hear from your actual experience and perspective. So I’d kind of like to start off by asking how has cyberbullying changed in the way of what you experienced and what resources are out there now? 

NA: 

Oh, my gosh, it’s changed so much. I’m 32. Whenever I experienced cyberbullying before recently it was on MySpace, AOL, etc. and you could turn it off; and it went away. But now it is a constant, just river of hate comments, of bullying. As an adult, I can turn it off and walk away from it, but I can see why younger kids are really suffering with it. It’s just constant. 

MP: 

Yeah. And that makes sense. Me being in the IT industry, everything is about social media. There are so many different platforms. Even if somebody bullies you on one, you jump to another. They’re usually going to follow or continue to come after you. It is a big deal. And everybody is on their phone, at all times. They can’t disconnect, which I think is another huge problem—people not being able to really disconnect. What is the best way that you feel that people in today’s age can disconnect? 

NA: 

For me, it was easier to disconnect because I have two children. I have a house to take care of. It kind of was: I don’t have time to filter through all of the cyberbullying—the comments, everything. But with younger kids, I feel like their best bet would be trying to do some kind of activity, something that isn’t related to their phone or social media to try and make that disconnect. 

MP: 

And what I’ve seen happen a lot is for me, as a tech, we would put some software on the phone and have parental control. And I feel that a big part that’s missing is parents are not looking at what their kids are doing, which opens up the issue of different people who can talk to them and bully them. So from a parent’s perspective, I’m assuming that you feel it’s very important that parents keep tabs on their kids and understand who they’re talking to and what topics. 

NA: 

Oh yeah; absolutely. I mean, I don’t think they need to invade privacy to the point of reading every message, but I think it’s important to know what social media they’re on; if they’re getting bullied, who is bullying them…and know what’s going on. 

Catch the rest of Nurse A.’s story about what she experienced, how she overcame it, and the effects of her cyberbullying (including her having to hire an attorney) here

If you are struggling with cyberbullying, this site has a lot of helpful tips. 

We are always available for consultations to make sure you and your family are safe from cyberbullying, including monitoring.  Feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation, at 702.350.1000.